Good news, Detroit Country Music proofs arrived

Today marked another milestone, as the proofs of the forthcoming book, "Detroit Country Music - Mountaineers, Cowboys, and Rockabillies" arrived from University of Michigan Press. The layout of its guts looks beautiful.

Where You Gonna Rock Tonight: Jimmy Franklin, Part 2

Jim Franklin composite of images, ca. 1962 In 1952 Jim Franklin played at WNAX radio. He returned to Detroit by 1956 and made two records for the Fortune label with other bands before striking out on his own. Part 2 of a 3-part biography.

Where You Gonna Rock Tonight: Jimmy Franklin, Part 1

Jimmy Franklin publicity portrait, late 1940s From 1948 to 1970, singer Jimmy Franklin made great western swing, country and rockabilly records in Detroit, before disappearing suddenly from the scene. Here is part one of two, wherein Franklin established himself among the best C&W entertainers of his day.

Cowboy crooner: Smilin’ Red Maxedon, part 2

Smilin' Red Maxedon (left) and unknown man, late 1940s During the 1940s, one of the best-known voices of Detroit radio was the mellow baritone of John “Smilin’ Red” Maxedon. He sang cowboy songs with reassuring ease over WJBK and WJR stations every day. In 1946 he began cutting records for the Detroit-based Arcadia company.

Cowboy crooner: Smilin’ Red Maxedon, part 1

Smilin' Red Maxedon, WJR radio During the 1940s, one of the best-known voices of Detroit radio was the mellow baritone of western singer John “Smilin’ Red” Maxedon. For several years, WJR radio’s clear channel 50,000-watt broadcast Maxedon's melodies every day.

Hall of Fame salutes steel guitarist Paul Franklin

This Saturday, March 23, 2013, the Country Music Hall of Fame in Nashville, Tennessee, spotlights Paul Franklin in part of its ongoing series called Nashville Cats.

Interview: Guitarist Tommy Odom, part 2

Tommy Odom, 2001. Second part of a 2001 conversation with Detroit country guitarist Tommy Odom. During 1940s to 1970s, Odom played take off guitar on western and swing records in Detroit by Roy Hall and his Cohutta Mountain Boys, among others.